Events and insight for sustainability

How business can tackle deforestation

Monday 3rd April
Tuesday 4th April

Timeslots are provisional and exact timings may change

9.00

Opening remarks by conference chair

9.10

We’re failing to protect forests, so what needs to change to meet 2020 targets and long-term deforestation commitments?

Despite all the meetings, frameworks and certification, forests are being cleared at a staggeringly unsustainable rate and as things stand they will be largely gone within 50 years. The current gradualist approach of continued deliberation on policy and methodology is failing to halt the seemingly inexorable process of forests clearance.

In this opening session, we provide a reflection on what the last five years have achieved in terms of corporate and NGO engagement with deforestation. We ask what has worked, what hasn’t, and how this should inform the next five years in terms of broad strategy to protect forests around the globe.

  • NGO campaigners: Are NGOs to blame for the lack of progress? Have they focused too much on consumer-facing businesses letting traders and financiers off?
  • Politics: How will the conservative and populist political movement sweeping western countries affect the protection of forests?
  • Corporates: Are there any significant areas of progress that we can say are working?
  • Do we need a fundamental redirect or refocus of strategy and what will it mean for each actor (corporate, NGO, government)?
  • What are our ‘philosophical’ end-goals? What is the picture of the future that we are trying to work towards?
  • Are we seeing the limitations of northern multinational initiatives? How do we engage with “southern” multinationals and more importantly, small-medium enterprises in the domestic markets?

Type: plenary

Format: question time

Speakers:

  • Barbara Bramble, vice president, international conservation and corporate strategies, National Wildlife Federation
  • Frances Seymour, senior fellow, Center for Global Development
  • Simon Lord, executive vice president, group sustainability & quality management, Sime Darby
  • Doug Boucher, scientific adviser, climate and energy program, Union of Concerned Scientists

Moderated by Stephen Donofrio, senior advisor, Supply Change

10.00

Morning break

10.30

Climate change, SDGs and deforestation: can companies tie it together via carbon credits?

As part of this ‘solutions under the spotlight’ session series, we examine in-depth how the SDGs and carbon credits can be linked to provide an effective solution for companies.

The session will ask whether landscape and ecosytem development and the verified carbon credit generated, can be used as an effective three-way boost to corporate impacts in stopping deforestation, expanding global carbon sinks to aid climate change mitigation and support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Our speakers will outline their context and nature of their solution, followed by a direct Q+A with the audience, focused on challenges and solutions.

Type: plenary

Format: live feedback – ‘solutions under the spotlight’

Presenters:

  • Anita McBain, head of sustainability research, Permian Global

Moderated by Toby Webb, founder, Innovation Forum 

11.30

Satellite monitoring of deforestation: useful tool or just another tech fad?

As part of this ‘solutions under the spotlight’ session, we examine the new in-vogue tech solution of monitoring deforestation using satellites. We explore the background technology of how the satellite-based system works and discuss the likely efficacy of such as tool in complementing corporate anti-deforestation strategy.

Our speakers will outline their context and nature of their solution, followed by a direct Q+A with the audience, focused on challenges and solutions.

Format: live feedback, ‘solutions under the spotlight’

Type: plenary 

Speaker: 

Norbert Schmitz, managing director, GRAS Global Risk Assessment Services

12.15

Lunch

13.15

Commodity-specific discussions

In these highly-interactive, two-hour breakout sessions, we will split the conference into four tracks that focus on the key commodities that drive deforestation in different jurisdictions. The purpose of the format is to capture the unique socio-economic, environmental and cultural challenges of each commodity, the specific regional differences regarding where they are produced and how they can be addressed.

Experts will facilitate the sessions to tease out the most topical questions for each commodity and to encourage the audience to discuss solutions.

Palm oil in Southeast Asia                    

Speakers:

  • Rachel Davis, managing director and co-founder, Shift
  • Forest Peoples Programme, speaker TBC
  • Simon Lord, executive vice president, group sustainability & quality management, Sime Darby

 

Pulp, paper and timber in North America

Speakers:

  • Skip Krasny, sustainable forestry programs, global sustainability, Kimberly Clark Corporation
  • Sophie Beckham, manager, forest stewardship and sustainability, International Paper
  • Paige Goff, VP, sustainability & business communications, Domtar
  • Ruth Noguerón, associate, World Resources Institute

 

Cattle in South America

Speakers:

  • Simon Hall, manager, tropical forest and agriculture project, National Wildlife Federation
  • Marcio Nappo, director, corporate sustainability, JBS
  • Rachael Sherman, director, global supply chain sustainability, McDonald's

 

Soy in South America

Speakers:

  • Robin Barr, director, Americas, TFT
  • Diego Di Martino, general projects manager, Archer Daniels Midland
  • Glenn Hurowitz, managing director, Waxman Strategies
  • Toby Webb, founder, Innovation Forum

15.45

Afternoon break and networking

16.15

NGOs, investors and campaigners: what do they want from business?

NGOs and investors are a major driver in pushing companies to engage with the issue of deforestation. NGO actions can affect the reputation of a business and negatively impact their market capitalisation, customer perceptions and overall commercial performance, while investors are increasingly asking the companies they own to reduce their exposure to environmental and social risks.

Understanding these perspectives and their plans is an essential part of overall strategy to ensure your company stays out of the negative headlines and is viewed favourably by investors. In this session, we will speak to some of the most influential stakeholders in the deforestation debate to get their views on corporate performance and where their priorities will be for 2017 and beyond. 

Type: plenary

Format: panel

Speakers:

  • Grant Rosoman, forest solutions team leader, Greenpeace
  • Chris Meyer, senior manager, forest policy, Environmental Defence Fund   
  • Nathalie Wallace, senior manager, investor program, Ceres
  • Olivia Watson, head of environmental and social issues, Principles for Responsible Investment

17.15

Jurisdictional and government engagement: how to do it in practice?

Government engagement is crucial to bringing real change and scale to any effort. This session will provide a pragmatic guide for companies to understand the best way to work with governments.

We will look to reflect on different examples of government engagement by companies on sustainability issues, how they have fared and what lessons have emerged.

  • Everyone is talking about jurisdictional approaches, but what are we really talking about? Is it realistic for suppliers to engage in such an approach and what are the early lessons from initial examples of its implementation from companies and governments?
  • How should a company manage the different approaches such as certifications and a jurisdictional approach to meet its commitments?
  • How do we collectively demonstrate that delivering on the zero-deforestation agenda is in local and national self-interest?
  • What does the demise of the Indonesian Palm Oil Pledge tell us about future private-sector-driven sustainability initiatives?
  • Can we create genuine bottom-up engagement to circumvent issues relating to nationalism and sovereignty ‘defensiveness’ on the part of forest-hosting developing countries?

Type: panel

Format: presentations followed by workgroup exercises

Speakers:

  • Frances Seymour, senior fellow, Center for Global Development
  • Richard Donovan, SVP and VP of forestry, Rainforest Alliance

18.15

Evening networking reception

9.00

Implementing a workplan to a zero-deforestation commitment - who is making real progress?

One of the main criticisms of company engagement on deforestation is that most are stuck at the policy phase, which is the first and easiest thing to do. Writing a policy doesn’t stop deforestation; acting on the commitment does. In this session, we will have a cross-industry panel of leading companies have gone about bringing their commitments into their operations.

We will have a pragmatic discussion on what actions companies with a zero-deforestation commitment need to take, and the best practices that are emerging as they get to grips with the reality of implementation.

  • What KPIs are companies using to monitor progress?
  • What incentives and dis-incentives are in place to encourage serious internal engagement?
  • Who do you have to engage internally? Is it just about engaging your procurement department?
  • What will it take for sustainability ‘characteristics’ to be as integral to a commodity as it’s physical ones?

Type: plenary

Format: question time

Speakers:

  • Karimah Hudda, global procurement sustainability lead, Mondelez International
  • Rachael Sherman, director, supply chain sustainability Asia, McDonald's
  • Jon Hixson, vice president, corporate affairs, Cargill     
  • Anita Neville, VP corporate communications & sustainability relations, Golden Agri-Resources
  • Lafcadio Cortesi, forest campaign director, Rainforest Action Network

10.00

Morning break

10.30

Supply chain transparency and traceability: can technology finally deliver?

In this session, we debate the current approaches that companies are using in palm oil, beef and timber to drive transparency, traceability and transformation down their respective value chains. We will then discuss the innovations in technology that could be leading to breakthroughs in achieving these.

The second part of the session will give an overview of the key technologies from parameter detection to satellite scanning of forests to understand how these monitoring tools are faring in piloting and implementation.

  • What new technologies are being implemented companies to protect forests?
  • How should this data and information be used by governments, NGOs and companies to enforce compliance?

Type: plenary

Format: panel

Speakers:

  • Robin Barr, director, Americas, TFT
  • Chris Raynham, forester, TFT Productive Forest Program, North America
  • Luis Amaral, director, Global Forest Watch Commodities
  • Jillian Gladstone, senior manager, forests, CDP

Moderated by Stephen Donofrio, senior advisor, Supply Change

11.30

Collaboration and partnerships: how can companies work both with NGOs and their competitors to scale impact?

Working in partnership towards a shared goal can reduce the burden for all, lower the cost for each partner and increase the scale of impact relative to a disjointed, individualistic approach. However, a lack of initiative, incompatibility of cultures and/or competitive instincts mean that there are few examples of companies properly engaging in effective collaborations with NGOs and competitors at any scale on sustainability issues.

In this session, we look to break down the barriers that prevent partnerships from forming on deforestation through a participatory set of multi-stakeholder tasks that will ask attendees to plan how to work with their potential partners.

  • How do you define the partnership, the goals and who to work with?
  • How do you structure a multi-stakeholder initiatives, where do you begin, what drives it and how can you ensure it does not run out of steam?

Type: plenary

Format: presentations followed by workgroup exercises  

Speakers:

  • Ethan Budiansky, director, environment, World Cocoa Foundation           
  • Paige Goff, VP, sustainability & business communications, Domtar
  • Christine Riley Miller, senior director, CSR, Dunkin' Brands
  • Kelly Goodejohn, director, ethical sourcing, Starbucks

12.30

Lunch

13.30

Case-study breakouts - set one

Corporate case-study breakouts 

In these concise 50-minute sessions, we outline highly informative case studies from the corporate and NGO world where organisations have made significant progress.

Set one 

Community-based approaches to protecting landscapes and forests - with APP

Forests can only thrive if people do. Community-based approaches are, theoretically, a very effective way to protect landscapes and reduce dependency on forest conversion and encroachment. In this session, APP shares their experience and learning in community engagement through a case study and an outline of what procedures have worked in delivering results.

Speaker:

Michael McManus, VP corporate and government affairs Americas, Asia Pulp & Paper

 

Accelerating collaboration to drive supply chain sustainability goals - with 3M

In this session, 3M leads a discussion on what brands, producers and others can do pre-competitively to achieve common forest products supply chain goals.  They will discuss the most difficult shared challenges, and how they can be more collaborative to amplify efforts and accelerate on-the-ground improvements.

Speaker:

Dawn Krueger, sustainability supply chain manager, 3M

 

Partnering for impact on climate change and deforestation in coffee – with Starbucks and Conservation International

This session will explore the role that the coffee sector can play in promoting resiliency in rural communities while mitigating carbon emissions. It will draw from the experience of the Starbucks – Conservation International partnership interventions, including the C.A.F.E. Practices sourcing standards, on-the-ground investments in coffee and climate initiatives, and the work of the Sustainable Coffee Challenge to advance actions that sustain the supply of coffee while conserving nature and improving the livelihoods of producing communities. 

Speakers:

Kelly Goodejohn, director, ethical sourcing, Starbucks

Bambi Semroc, senior strategic advisor, Conservation International

14.20

Case-study breakouts - set two

How to achieve 100% sustainable palm oil sourcing – with Mondelez International

As part of its updated Palm Oil Action Plan, and in a move to hopefully catalyze systemic change, Mondelēz was the first multinational consumer goods company to require suppliers to track oil sourced from third-party suppliers as well as their own farms. In this session, we get an insight into the practical actions being taken by the company to achieve the new milestones and requirements in has set for suppliers in working toward a truly sustainable supply chain for palm oil.

Speaker:

Karimah Hudda, global procurement sustainability lead, Mondelez International

 

High Carbon Stock convergence explained - with Greenpeace 

Understanding what zero-deforestation means is one of the most difficult questions for a business to answer, but it is essential to ensuring commitments and strategy are realistic. In this session, we discuss the latest approach that has come out of the High Carbon Stock Convergence Group of palm oil producers, buyers and NGOs in creating a unified approach to implementing zero-deforestation commitments.

Speaker:

Grant Rosoman, forest solutions team leader, Greenpeace

15.40

Afternoon break

16.10

How to prepare a sustainable hamburger and protect forests

Being able to produce beef without deforestation, while at the same time addressing increasing cattle productivity and raw material quality is essential to protect the environment and mitigate Climate Change effects. The McDonald’s and JBS partnership to produce the “Sustainable Hamburger” in Brazil is an innovative approach to develop a sustainable food chain. This session will provide an overview of two global company’s collaborative work and explore the challenges and opportunities in replicating and scaling up this model.

Format: case study 

Speakers:

Marcio Nappo, director, corporate sustainability, JBS

Rachael Sherman, director, global supply chain sustainability, McDonalds        

17.00

End of conference

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Download the 2017 event brochure here